Negotiating the Travel Nurse Contract Extension

Sponsored by: Aya Healthcare

Sometime around week 8 (or after) you should start considering if you would be interested in a Contract extension.  There are multiple variables that will determine if you would like to extend at your current contract. 

negotaite contract extensionMany facilities will approach you right away for a contract extension, I don’t recommend that you entertain this until at least week 8.  By week 8 you will know if you like the facility, if you can get along with the work load and if there is enough ‘tourism’ in the area to keep you interested for an extension.

Factors to Consider when Determining if you want to pursue a Contract Extension
  • Do you like working at the Facility?
  • Is the work-load manageable?
  • Are there still things that you want to explore/do In the local area?
  • Do you have any family or other obligations that will require you to be in a particular area?
  • Are there upcoming Holidays that would effect a possible extension?
Negotiating the Contract Extension:

Kyle at TheTruthAboutTravelNursing makes some great points in regards to company costs for a contract extension.  I would recommend that you read through it to better understand the cost factors from a company standpoint. There are multiple items that you can and should consider when negotiating an extension:

  • Bonuses
  • Flight Home
  • Time Off without Housing Penalties
  • Housing Changes
  • Length of Extension

Contract extensions are a cost benefit (most times) for everyone involved.  The hospital has already ‘trained’ you and you continuing on enables the hospital to avoid having to train a new traveler.  They don’t have to send you through orientation again and will save costs there. A hospital may also look at you extending as a compliment.  You have enjoyed working at the hospital well enough to stay a bit longer.

For the Staffing Agency, you offer a cost savings from multiple standpoints by extending.  Again, check the article linked above to read more about these cost savings.

For you (this is the most important, right?)  You will benefit by not incurring the added expenses of moving to a new location.  Although some of your expenses are covered by the Staffing agency when taking a new contract, there are still out of pocket expenses that you incur as a Travel Nurse.  You will also avoid time off without pay (unless you choose to take time off between the original contract and the extension).

What do you negotiate for with a contract extension?  Do you extend early in the contract or wait until close to the end?

Sponsored by: Aya Healthcare

Since 2001, Aya Healthcare has been facilitating great travel nursing experiences. Aya Healthcare is committed to the highest clinical standards and has been Joint Commission certified since 2006.  Aya Healthcare  travel nurses are featured on MTV’s Scrubbing In. The company previously received national media attention for 13 weeks, a travel nursing reality show it released in 2006. 13 weeks won the media award from the American Academy of Nursing.  Aya Healthcare is dedicated  to providing exceptional service to every travel nurse, on every assignment and offers unique perks like airport pick up in Sacramento for nurses going to the California Nursing Board.  Aya Healthcare is one of the largest travel nursing companies in the country and currently has travelers on assignment in 47 states.

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TheGypsyNurse

As a travel nursing educator, Candy aka Gypsy Nurse, RN has worked in healthcare for nearly 20 years, working up the ranks from CNA to LPN to RN. For the past nine years, she’s worked as a travel nurse, allowing her to practice and live in 15 states throughout the U.S. She regularly shares advice for those interested in travel nurse jobs on her website at: www.thegypsynurse.com.

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5 Responses to Negotiating the Travel Nurse Contract Extension

  1. […] For an experienced travel nurse’s insight on this topic, I highly recommend this article from the Gypsy Nurse. […]

  2. […] travel nurses contract for 13 weeks at a time. Many travel nurses choose to extend another thirteen weeks if the need is there and they like the […]

  3. […] As always, please share your thoughts, experiences, and questions with us in the comments section. For an experienced travel nurse’s insight on contract extensions, I highly recommend this article from the Gypsy Nurse. […]

    • Heidi says:

      This is a very helpful article. I wish I had read it before I agreed to extend my current assignment for the second time. The company has not given me a bonus, or travel pay and when I requested time off, they made me pay the typical penalty because I missed a shift. My recruiter said these were things I should have asked for when I agreed to extend, not right before the extension begins. I shall live and learn from this!!!

      • TheGypsyNurse says:

        I’m happy to hear that this information was helpful for you. Traveling as a medical professional involves a learning curve for all of us.

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